Wednesday, 25 November 2015

DANGERS OF NOT SLEEPING.
Just so you know, your mid-night talking, night parties, night shifts and other night-related activities and jobs may be detrimental to your health as it doesn’t let you get ample dosage of sleep. Here are the consequences of not getting a good sleep as a student.
-Lower GPA: Researches suggests that students who sleep the least earn lower grades than those who sleep nine or more hours per night. Your brain needs to cycle through certain deep sleep stages to store memories and solidify the things you learn. When you fall asleep, your heart rate and metabolic rate drop so your body can focus on those things. No sleep, no storage.
-Impaired creativity: Neuroimaging studies suggest that the brain spontaneously reorganizes information when you rest, which could explain why it's so much harder to focus and come up with ideas when you haven't slept. 
-Poor decisions: Many parts of the brain are involved in decision-making. When you don't give your brain enough rest, it functions at half-mast, and you'll end up making less than savory choices.
-Increased risk of disease
-Heightened blood pressure: Sleep loss stresses out your body and mind in a way that causes your blood pressure to spike. Over time, this could damage your heart, arteries, kidneys, and even bring about stroke, loss of vision, and a host of other health problems. You seriously don't want. 
-Weakened immune system and reduced effectiveness of certain vaccinations
-Stress: When you don't get enough sleep, your body naturally releases the stress hormone cortisol.
-Moodiness
-Poor decisions: Many parts of the brain are involved in decision-making. When you don't give your brain enough rest, it functions at half-mast, and you'll end up making less than savory choices.
-Twitchy eyes: Fatigue can cause an awkward-looking eye spaz called nystagmus, which makes your eyeballs move even involuntarily, even though your head is still.
-Weight gain: Studies have found that people who sleep less are more likely to be overweight. That's probably because sleep deprivation messes with the hormones that regulate your appetite (ghrelin) and tell your brain you're full (leptin), which can lead to chronic overeating. 
-Depression: Sleep and depression are interrelated: Research suggests people who suffer from insomnia are more likely to suffer from major depression than people who sleep regularly. 
-Slower reaction time: When your brain isn't well rested, it doesn't take in information, process it, and respond to it as quickly as usual. You lose speed before accuracy, you'll get your work done, but it will take longer.  
-Shaking: Shaking can mess with your ability to carry out precise movements and detail-oriented tasks, like needle threading and tweezing your eyebrows.
-Premature aging: When you don't get enough sleep, your body releases the stress hormone cortisol. If your body releases too much cortisol, it starts to break down collagen, a protein that promotes smooth skin and elasticity. Sleep deprivation also may decrease the production of the growth hormones in your body that strengthen the skin and fend off wrinkles.
-Dry skin: Sleep helps hydrate your skin so it doesn't get all dry and flaky. In other words, adequate sleep is like a natural moisturizer. 
-Dull skin: Sleep improves blood flow to the skin. Don't get enough sleep, and your skin will look blotchy or pale.
-Skin sensitivity: Your body's immune system builds its strength while you sleep. Sleep deprivation can make your skin more sensitive and even worsen existing skin conditions like rosacea or eczema.
Most of the points are put together from studies by Dr Bank and Dr Paruthi.

2 comments:

  1. This article was really for me. Lol

    ReplyDelete
  2. Dark.... I didn't see death.

    ReplyDelete